The Lady in the Chamber

A recent investigation has raised the possibility of a hidden compartment in Tutankamun’s tomb that may hold secrets about Nefertiti, (his mother or step-mother.) As the wife of a disgraced pharaoh her right to a royal burial would have been tenuous.
WP IMAGEThe tomb is the size and shape of a Lady’s and this has been a confusion for archaeologists.

If she is hidden away in there (and it’s still uncertain) it offers a feasible explanation for another mystery: Tut’s coffin was hastily modified (brutally) to fit his tomb chamber because it was too big for the space available. Using it as a door stop may have been the reason.

Ruling in equal partnership, she was held in great esteem and had real power until her husband died, Akenaten, the cursed reformer who put all the temples out of business by declaring a single god, the sun or Aten. He moved the principal place of worship away from Karnak to a new city in Amarna.

The clergy weren’t too pleased about this and when he died they rejected the change and destroyed all evidence of his heresy in a national upsurge to return to traditional values.

During his reign he was responsible
for a cultural renaissance and a new age of fine art – most of it smashed up during the rout.

Great possibilities for a writer and I can feel a storyline coming on.

About garth

I'm an indie author ardently writing fiction and you’ll notice a leaning towards Egypt. The book in the cooker right now is called The River Through. Hatsepsut features strong as an ancient enigma bringing her people back to pure after a sullying occupation by the Hyksos. I like these desert ancestors who dragged great chunks of stone for miles to build runways for god. Religion was a major preoccupation always. Magic was mixed in, sometimes called miracles. Christian and Hebrew testaments carried it over. Egyptians weren’t bothered with a history list based on sequential record keeping so there are numerous and bewildering gaps. A definite plus for the fiction writer. (Colouring in the spaces.) Bio: I am very tall and many people call me a freak (and laugh) so a slight chip on the shoulder but thick skinned - not impervious. Lots of short people out there who aren’t pleased to be little too. Given the choice, I’d keep length. Upbringing I am thankful because, during my life I have found many people who weren't so blessed so thanks mum and dad for pulling me out of the lucky dip. Two sisters and a brother, all of them cleverer than me or so they think. A wife who loves me - thanks Gill xxxx Two daughters, a yoga teacher and a nurse who don't quite hate me but we are moving in that direction as I tread heavier with advice. Lovely grandchildren who will develop into super beings if they maintain the current progress. A cat called Squeezely who has finally learned to evacuate his bowels outside. Buster the darling dog with a sensitive way and an over-exuberance for affection but we all let him take us down for licking. He's big. Occupation: Education first: Good military school that chased out the bad in me I can tell you. No-one put a polish on a boot better but it was enjoyable in retrospect. Not at the time though. Art college next and enlightenment - the world was a better place afterwards. Self employed antique furniture and restoration - very enjoyable and fulfilling but not overflowing financially. We did okay and we prospered.
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11 Responses to The Lady in the Chamber

  1. Vibrant says:

    Dear Garth,

    It’s an interesting mystery. 🙂

    Do you think that my asking questions here would mar your books which are mystery?

    If not, then I would like to ask: Why was Tutankhamun’s father(pharaoh) disgraced?

    You know–as I child I used to read many comic books and there were many myths surrounding Tutankhamun’s persona. Why was Tutankhamun so popular among all Egyptian rulers?

    Sincerely,
    Anand

    Liked by 1 person

    • garthmr says:

      I like your interest Anand. Tut’s father introduced the idea of one god at a time in history when other belief systems were developing like Judaism. The change wasn’t accepted by the Egyptian priests – they were glad to be rid of him when he died. Tut and Nefertiti were the embarrassing relations of a heretic

      Liked by 1 person

      • Vibrant says:

        Now I understand it. Does it mean that priests in ancient Egypt wielded more power than pharaoh did?

        Like

      • garthmr says:

        As the nation became more powerful the battle commenced unless there was a strong personality on the throne who served the people well. Most people respond to wisdom but there are always the ambitious ones who want power for its own sake so you get conflict.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vibrant says:

        True. Garth, did you receive a notification as I have nominated for “The Brotherhood of the World” award?

        Like

      • garthmr says:

        I am very honoured to be nominated by you but I haven’t read all the information completely yet and I’m not sure how to do it. (Not how to answer the questions – I love that bit)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vibrant says:

        Please take your time Garth–there is no hurry–take a week or more if you need 🙂
        Just wanted to confirm if you received the notification 🙂

        Sincerely,
        Anand

        Like

      • garthmr says:

        ran out of space – do I put a blog up with my answers?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vibrant says:

        Yes. You put your answers and nominate a few people with giving links for their blogs–only if you feel like doing so–nothing is ‘compulsory.’ It is your choice 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • garthmr says:

        I’d like to do it and it will be good to engage more, rather than obsess about getting my blog sorted out. I am slow about this but diligence always brings results

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vibrant says:

        Yes slow and steady wins the race 🙂

        Like

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